My First Frostbite

As a club we decided to put on our first Frostbite (since I have been at the club anyway). I decided that the 1st Saturday in January every year is a good date – easy to remember and just after Christmas so everyone should be around for it. Well it wasn’t frosty, a bit misty though but the turnout was good with people we haven’t seen shoot for ages suddenly appeared.

In the end 13 of us shot, I only expected about 7 people. It was about 7-9 degrees so not exactly cold. Shooting 6 arrows again did feel difficult, we must be fitter than we think in the Summer. A lot of people didn’t know their sight marks for 30m either which made for some interesting shots in the first few ends.

We stopped after 3 ends and sighters for hot drinks and then continued on. Everybody enjoyed it and I finished with 291 on my recurve, shame I didn’t break 300 – I will next time! We may even do a frostbite round every month over Winter instead of keeping it to what we thought would be an annual thing.

I have ordered the Frostbite badges from Reading Archers for the people who scored over 200, as the badges only start at 200.

Portsmouth 543 again

This weekend I managed to injure my knee by twisting it coming off a ladder at home. Very painful and difficult to walk although it did not stop me shooting a Portsmouth round on Sunday at the club and hobbling around.

It turned out that on the first nominated Portsmouth round of the year I managed to equal my Personal Best of 543 again! Even though I felt the score was higher when I shot it. I don’t like adding up as I go, as I think doing it may put me off.

Got home and entered everyone’s scores into Golden Records and it turns out that it saw the score as a Personal Best even though the score was the same as a previous one but because I scored 1 more gold this time – 24 instead of the previous 23.

What does it take to get over 550 and not just over 550 for a Portsmouth badge but 554 for a C classification!

Portsmouth 534 Score

At last it’s time to go indoors again for the 2016-2017 indoor season. It was getting dark too quickly outside, we barely had time to set up and shoot for an hour before it was dark during the week at the club. The weather also seems to have turned in the UK with darker days, even more wind and rain.

So we had our first Friday night indoors and all went well with a little bit of tuning. The hardest thing was remembering where the shooting line and target line were.

On Sunday we had our first Portsmouth nominated round. We had a few problems setting up as the back stop netting props had disappeared we think the builders who overhauled the sports storage room used the wood in the walls whilst doing the re-fit. So new ones need to made up.

I scored 534 in the Portsmouth, a personal best for me, my previous best was 526. I shot 22 tens out of 60, although I did have some 7’s and the odd one lower than that. But it must be possible to hit 60 nine’s and so score 540 plus the odd 10 thrown in for good measure – so score around 550+. But it’s all really about being consistent when shooting 3 arrows.

Shooting a Second Detail

This indoor season we have also decided to do second details in order to slow down the shooting, otherwise it felt like a marching band shooting 3 arrows, collecting, returning and shooting again.

The good thing about having a second details is that it gives everyone a competition feel, it also puts 4 people on a boss so makes the shooting more social. It also as I said slows the shooting down. It seems to be working OK after 1 week.

Half Metric Round Shot

This Sunday we shot our first Half Metric round. I knew when I looked at the round it was going to be confusing to set up with everyone wanting to do different versions and so different distances. Plus then you have to stop half way through and change all the 122cm targets to 80cm targets for the last two distances.

The strange thing was that we all started spread out along the shooting line from 70 metres to 60 metres and below but we all slowly seemed to be squashed together when the last 1.5 dozen arrows were at the 30m distance and we all stood together. Plus shooting at a 30m distance meant all our arrows were tightly packed together in the gold on the targets.

One of the other strange distances was the Half Metric V, which is a junior round really and is 30m, 20m, 15m and 10m. We didn’t have distance markers on the floor for less than 20 yards so the 15m and 10m had to be measured out.

I think we all enjoyed it though, and it’s good to try out new rounds. We will do it again in September.

Long Metric done

This week was the first time I had shot a Long Metric. I decided to do a Long Metric II, which is 60m and 50m. The strange this is the 50m target face is 122cm, you would have thought at the 50m you would have to change it to an 80cm face – but no.

Anyway, 60m seems a nice distance to practice on before going up to shoot at a WA 70m target. I highly recommend it. The 60m can build your confidence when all you can get in a Long Metric II is a 2nd class, but in the WA 70m you can get yourself a 1st class.

It was not a windy day, but it was grey and it did rain at times. We shot through the light rain, but when the heavy rain came we ran back to the pavilion to wait for about 20-30minutes. Then we were back out to finish off the Long Metric. I finished with 520 out of 720 – so that’s a 2nd class. As I was the first male recurve archer in the club to shoot a Long Metric II – I now by default have the club record!

I think I could have done better, but one thing that did seem to help was putting flags on the top of the target bosses in order to try and read the wind.

Target Boss from below

First Short Metric Done

This month at the club I have planned to shoot a number of metric rounds. The club previously have never really shot any metric rounds other than WA 70m rounds. So I decided to pick out the most popular. We shall be doing a Short Metric, Long Metric and then a Half Metric.

This week was our first the Short Metric. As the longest Short Metric you can shoot is 50m and 30m, most of our archers chose that. So we had 5 targets set up at 50m to start with. One junior archer did a Short Metric III of 30m and 20m.

We had to make sure that we had some 80cm target faces as opposed to the standard 122cm targets. It was really nice to see all the bosses lined up in a row, it felt like a tournament. The smaller target faces also made you try and concentrate more and at time they were tricky. Especially when you are 10 zone scoring.

I finished with a round of 516 out of 720 – perhaps not my best effort. But I am still trying to get used to not using a clicker and use my back more. It would be interesting to re-do the Short Metric later on in the season when the clicker is back in use (hopefully!).

I definitely did not feel as tired on this round, so either I am using my back more, or I am varying my draw length when I get tired so it makes it feel less taxing. Now it seems to be my right hand which aches more, and as I am a left-handed archer – that’s the arm I hold my bow with!

Next week we have a Long Metric, but unfortunately that’s all on 122cm target faces. Plus do I try and shoot the 90m and 70m round or stick to a 60m and 50m round?

Short Metric round

 

Warwick – Nearly a Club Record

Only 5 of us turned up for shooting last night, that must be the lowest number for a while. But the great thing was there was no wind last night on the field for a change.

I decided to shoot and score a standard Warwick round (2 dozen arrows at 60yds and 2 dozen arrows at 50yds). It’s funny how after shooting the 60yds I think I actually shoot better on the longer 60yds than the 50yds.

But I ended up with 21 Golds out of 48, but unfortunately four 5’s appeared on my score sheet throughout the round. This gave me a total of 366 out of a possible 432. Our current club record for senior Gents is 338. So I was a bit gutted not to have turned some of those 5’s into 7’s or 9’s.

Never mind it was still a personal best for me, and I shall try again on the next clam evening.

Portsmouth Zero Round

On Sunday we had our end of season shoot with a newly devised round called a Portsmouth Zero.

It’s a regular Portsmouth but once you have shot 12 arrows you take the higher 6 arrow score away from the lower 6 arrow score and this number goes in the end row box.

You then do the same thing for the following 5 rows on the scoresheet. At the end you add up the 6 numbers in the columns and you come up with your final score.

The winner is the archer with the total number closest to zero.

Getting a number closer to zero should mean that you are shooting consistently, but this could be consistently well or consistently badly.

I ended up 4th with a Portsmouth Zero score of 14 and a Portsmouth score of 510.

The only problem is that the archer if monitoring the score sheet could go ahead and on purpose shoot a particular score they need to obtain a low ‘end of the row’ score.

If this wanted to be extended I suppose you could think about not just adding up horizontal groups of arrows you could add up the vertical numbers as well, in order to get an even better overall feel of how consistently the shooting was.

Further to this you could look at handicaps or add penalty points if the ‘row score’ is not over a certain value.

We are always trying to come up with something different to shoot on a special shoot day, (we played black jack with 3 arrows at Christmas) so if you have anything that could be of use to us and fun please me know.